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iPhone: Distinctive and Inviting

My friend Tamara got an iPhone over the weekend, and I got a chance to play with it Sunday. After watching her use it, listening to her comments, and trying it for myself, I concluded that the iPhone is distinctive and inviting.

The iPhone is distinctive in the sense that I have never seen another phone that simultaneously is sleek, has a large and bright screen, and has a fingerable touch screen. My 8525 has a fairly large screen and a stylus touch screen, and it is more powerful, but it is by no means sleek. It looks clunky in comparison to an iPhone.

The iPhone is inviting in the sense that, while not necessarily easier to use than many other phones, the phone's user interface is innovative and stylish. You want to hold the phone and use it if just because it looks so "neat".

That said, aside from its distinctive and inviting look, I see little reason to buy an iPhone. And it still remains to be seen whether the iPhone will be a success in the long run.

Comments

Mauricio said…
Hi Roger, I'm a Sr Executive recruiter and would love to talk to you about professional opportunities.

Feel free to contact me at mauriciop@avature.net to hear more.

Thanks!
free2choose said…
Hi Roger

I'm impressed that you actually shorted Apple stock in January considering the hype about the iPhone's success and the best part is you made money.

Looking at Apple's price today, I am thinking of shorting Apple for one main reason, the glass touch screen cracks too easily when dropped and given that phones tend to end up in all sorts of unexpected places, people are going to find that they bought a $600 test tube which needs to be handled with too much care.
Reports of cracked units being replaced in the 1st week for free will help to minimise negative publicity for now but what if it results in a massive recall? That could spell disaster till Apple finds a more durable screen and we could make a killing!!

I can't believe that Steve Jobs would actually make the IPhone screen with glass when even my spectacles are already made of high quality plastics!

Let me know as I intend to buy some puts at the current price!

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